Reinterpretation of the Controlled Substances Act: Implications for Nursing Practice, Patient Care, and Nursing Ethics

Reinterpretation of the Controlled Substances Act: Implications for Nursing Practice, Patient Care, and Nursing Ethics

Identification: MSNN1205
Credits (Post Test and/or Evaluation Required)
Available until 08/31/2014
  • 1.00 - CH
  • 0.00 - Rx

Standard: $20.00

Description

In 1970, Congress enacted the Controlled Substances Act as part of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act. Enforced by the Food and Drug Administration, the Act established the five schedules, or categories, of controlled substances and the drugs under each schedule. In 1973, the Department of Justice created the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to coadminister the Controlled Substances Act with the Food and Drug Administration. In 1986, the DEA was given sole authority to schedule controlled substances and was also tasked with regulating individuals and organizations that manufacture, transfer, or dispense scheduled drugs. The Office of Diversion Control within the DEA is responsible for ensuring that scheduled drugs are not used for nonmedical purposes (Abrams, Pennington, & Lammon, 2007; Garrison & Mitty, 2010).

Author(s)

Credits Available


Reinterpretation of the Controlled Substances Act: Implications for Nursing Practice, Patient Care, and Nursing Ethics

You must be logged in and own this product in order to post comments.

Rosalinda Paleracio
8/2/18 11:58 pm

/